In Memoriam Tom Wolfe

In Memoriam Tom Wolfe

But no, the famed paragon of New Journalism is not the same Tom Wolfe who co-wrote Farley's last movie, which has an abysmal 8 percent on RottenTomatoes despite a starry '90s cast and director Christopher Guest.

Wolfe's influence is profound on American culture and its lexicon - "the right stuff", "radical chic" and "the Me Decade" (read Wolfe on all three by clicking their respective links) being but three of Wolfe's phrases which demonstrate his exceptional linguistic acumen - it will be felt for time immemorial.

Wolfe himself coined the term in 1973 when he published a book of articles called The New Journalism, featuring the likes of Truman Capote, Joan Didion and Gay Talese, who penned the famous literary-style profile "Frank Sinatra Has A Cold".

"The Right Stuff" was adopted into a film in 1983.




Wolfe's works - fiction and non-fiction alike - looked at realms ranging from the art world to Wall Street to 1960s hippie culture and touched on the issues of class, power, race, corruption and sex.

Wolfe was also a style icon, known for wearing a crisp white suit everywhere he went.

Wolfe followed with more novels - A Man in Full about race, big money and high society in Atlanta; I Am Charlotte Simmons, a tale of college high life and Back to Blood about immigrants in Florida in 2012.

If you're looking for a glimpse into the mind of Tom Wolfe, look no further than the New York Public Library. He is survived by his wife Sheila, the cover designer for Harper's Magazine, his daughter Alexandra, and son Tommy.

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