Net Neutrality Lives on in Washington State After FCC Kills It

Net Neutrality Lives on in Washington State After FCC Kills It

Pai told CBS that he doesn't believe regulating the internet in the same way phone networks are regulated is the best way to achieve the goal of a "free and open" internet.

The issue of net neutrality has sparked intense debate in the USA since last April when FCC chairman Ajit Pai, a Republican appointed by President Donald Trump, announced that under his leadership the FCC would repeal landmark net neutrality rules created under President Obama in 2015.

"In the short-run, we'll see that internet service providers will recruit higher-end users, knowing that they can take speed and service away from you and me in order to provide that faster service to higher-end customers who are paying more", Portney said.

Q. What's net neutrality, again?

No Throttling: broadband providers may not impair or degrade lawful Internet traffic on the basis of content, applications, services, or non-harmful devices. But unlike with the issues of blocking or slowing access to internet services, they've been much less definitive on fast lanes.

The way the internet is regulated in the United States is about to change.




Critics of net neutrality, including the Trump administration, say such rules impeded companies' ability to adapt to a quickly evolving internet.

FCC Commissioner Jessica Rosenworcel, a Democrat who voted against the repeal, said Monday that the decision put the FCC "on the wrong side of history, the wrong side of the law, and the wrong side of the American public". Supporters of net neutrality have also said that without regulation, a greater socio-economic digital divide could develop, creating a class of information "haves" and "have nots". Many Internet providers, such as AT&T and Verizon, have said they do not and will not block or slow content. Comcast has also said it does not block or slow content and has no plans to offer paid prioritization. They're anxious the providers will charge consumers extra to reach particular sites and services in a speedy manner, either by directly billing them or by charging companies like Netflix, which could be expected to pass on the costs to their subscribers.

The FTC would theoretically file lawsuits against ISPs that make net neutrality promises and then break them.

Net neutrality was repealed past year under an order called the "Restoring Internet Freedom" order.

The governors of New York, New Jersey, and Montana, for example, have each signed executive orders requiring broadband providers with state contracts to be net neutral.

The end of "net neutrality" is going to majorly affect the way internet-service providers do business, but how noticeable will the changes be for you, the customer? The Senate already voted in favor of the effort, which now faces tougher odds in terms of getting a House vote and avoiding a veto by President Trump. Many Democrats say the issue will help motivate younger people to vote in congressional elections this November, when all 435 seats in the House and a third of the 100-member Senate will be up for grabs.

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