Cyril Ramaphosa to reveal Nhlanhla Nene's fate

Cyril Ramaphosa to reveal Nhlanhla Nene's fate

The Guptas, who face numerous allegations of using their friendship with former leader Jacob Zuma for mutual self-enrichment, have consistently denied any wrongdoing. The court further ordered her to pay 20% of the legal costs for the Black Sash and Freedom under law - the two non-governmental organisations that took her to court after Sassa said a year ago that it would be unble to pay social grants from April 2017.

"I am human too, I do make mistakes, including those of poor judgement", Nene said.

"These visits do cast a shadow on my conduct as a public office bearer".

Ramaphosa said Mboweni, the former Governor of the Reserve Bank, brings in much-needed leadership. "I deeply regret these lapses and beg your forgiveness".

The Guptas are a trio of Indian-born brothers accused of fraudulently profiting from vast government contracts and energy and transport deals under Zuma, who ruled from 2009 to 2018. He is the kind of person who will be able to take those decisions.

Botes said the rand would likely trade in a range between R14.83/$ and R15.00/$ on Tuesday.




At the graft inquiry, Nene accused Zuma of pushing policies created to benefit the Guptas, including a massive nuclear power expansion programme.

Nene said he believed he was sacked because he refused to "toe the line" on projects, including a since-abandoned deal for nuclear energy, that may have benefited the Gupta family and other Zuma associates.

This revelation at the state capture inquiry raised serious questions about Nene's credibility, particularly whether the Guptas had any role in his previous Cabinet deployments and whether he at any stage had acted under their instruction.

Opposition parties have called for his resignation.

South Africa, Africa's most advanced economy, slipped into recession in the second quarter of this year, and suffers a stubbornly high unemployment of about 28 percent.

"We are concerned that during the years that he was out in the political cold, he often came over on social media, at least, as a little looney posting content that seemed to be at odds with government policy", Maynier said, with an attached picture of Mboweni advocating for 40% ownership of mining companies by the state.

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